Amy Buhler, Marston Science Library

Amy Buhler, Marston Science Library

As a librarian, I value evidence-based decision-making and understand the important role assessment plays in ensuring quality learning benchmarks. However, it is clear that long-standing inequities exist in higher education, as well as in higher education's implementation of assessment practices. It is critical that we carefully and continuously examine these processes, identify inequities, and infuse fairness and equity as part of our efforts to dismantle structures that disenfranchise diverse, underrepresented and underserved populations. I believe that placing equity and fairness at the forefront of assessment activities will prioritize changes that will result in an environment that is both conducive for learning and welcoming for all. - Amy Buhler

Amy Buhler is a University Librarian at the University of Florida Marston Science Library. She is an engineering librarian who provides research expertise and instructional support to the areas of Agricultural & Biological Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, and Engineering Education. Prior to her work at Marston, she was a medical librarian at the University of Florida Health Science Center Libraries. Her research interests surround issues related to assessment of information seeking behaviors, library instruction, and the marketing and outreach of library services. Ms. Buhler has conducted research funded by the National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, and the Institute of Museum and Library Services. She holds a B.A. from the University of Florida and an M.S.L.S from the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill.

Model Development group
Suzie Burns, Admissions

Suzie Burns, Admissions

To me, fairness and equity in assessment at UF means being inclusive and allowing everyone to have a voice. Working in the Office of Admissions for the past seven years has opened my eyes to what it means to be fair and equal from the applicant perspective. I’m excited to serve on this Task Force and contribute to the goal of having fairness and equity in assessment in all contexts at UF. - Suzie Burns

Suzie Burns is an Associate Director of Admissions for Campus Relations in the University of Florida’s Office of Admissions. She has been working in the Office of Admissions for over seven years and served on multiple system implementation teams. Suzie also served on the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion group in the Division of Enrollment Management. She earned her bachelor’s degree from the University of Florida and her master’s degree from Northern Arizona University. She is currently in the final year of the Organizational Change and Leadership doctoral program at the University of Southern California.

GUideline Development Group
Jerri-ann Danso, Student Affairs

Jerri-ann Danso, Student Affairs

Fairness and equity in assessment in higher education is of critical importance as college campuses become increasingly more diverse. At the University of Florida, it is imperative that we incorporate fairness and equity into assessment best practices as we strive to foster a truly inclusive environment for today’s college student. Furthermore, as higher education serves as a major pipeline to the global workforce, transforming a culture to ensure equitable assessment practices that may have historically excluded marginalized student populations could promote a more level playing field for our graduates. -Jerri-ann Danso

Jerri-ann Danso is a student affairs practitioner who draws from over six years of higher education assessment experience, particularly through her work in career services, academic affairs, and now, Student Affairs Assessment and Research (SAAR). She earned a bachelor’s degree in Business Administration (major in Management), master’s in Student Personnel in Higher Education, and is currently in pursuit of a second master’s degree in Research and Evaluation Methodology. Over the years, she has worked on career outcomes data through UF’s centralized career center, and on pharmacy education data through UF’s College of Pharmacy. In her current role, Jerri incorporates into her everyday work her enthusiasm for assessment, passion for learning, and commitment to building assessment capacity within the Division of Student Affairs.

Guideline Development Group
Ana Paula Dias Ribeiro, College of Dentistry

Ana Paula Dias Ribeiro, College of Dentistry

Since I decided to become a dental educator, assessments have called my attention as I see them as one of the most difficult tasks that as a faculty member I should complete. In the same way that we have different types of learners, there are also multiple ways to assess the mastery of a competency accounting for the diverse student population that we currently have in Higher Education. Therefore, designing assessments with equity and fairness in mind should be a priority in every Institution. - Ana Dias Ribeiro

Ana Paula D. Ribeiro is Clinical Assistant Professor of the Restorative Dental Sciences Department at the University of Florida College of Dentistry; she also serves as Director of Curriculum for the Department of Restorative Dental Sciences, chair of the Curriculum Committee, member of the Research and Constitution committees and the Commission on Change and Innovation in Dental Education Liason for UFCD. She teaches in many pre-clinical and clinical courses and was chosen as the Class Advisor for Classes 2020 and 2023. Dr. Ribeiro is also involved in patient care and research, particularly in the area of dental material biocompatibility, , cariology, and educational/public health research.

Guideline Development Group
Anne Dillard, College of Nursing

Anne Dillard, College of Nursing

Creative thought is required when planning assessments of student learning in higher education. As a demonstration of integrity, educators should offer a wide range of reliable assessment methods that align with a varying level of student resources. With this individualized approach, we can deliver fair and diverse assessments that dissolve barriers and build equitable outcomes.  In this fashion, we serve as role models who are removing obstacles and prioritizing the core values of fairness and equity. - Anne Dillard

Anne Dillard is a clinical assistant professor in the College of Nursing. As a certified nurse educator (CNE), she focuses on engaging learners in diverse topics related to adult health, pathophysiology, and pharmacology. Dr. Dillard is committed to team-teaching.  She is successfully coordinating faculty and learners on two campuses to achieve excellence in all course activities under her management. Her teaching role extends into the clinical setting where she is supporting student learning with her expert skills as an Adult Clinical Nurse Specialist. She also serving the college as an active member of the Academic Affairs Committee. Areas of research interest include fair testing methods in nursing education, improving experiential learning at the bedside, and use of simulation in nursing education.

Model Development Group
Jennifer Drew, College of Agricultural and Life Sciences

Jennifer Drew, College of Agricultural and Life Sciences

An intentional and unbiased process is necessary to ensure that the assessment of learning outcomes of all students is fair, equitable, and appropriate. Examining current practices, identifying barriers that hinder progress, and promoting innovative best practices, aligns with and allows us to measure the success of the UF mission ‘to enable our students  to lead and to influence the next generation and beyond. - Jennifer Drew 

 

Jennifer Drew is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Microbiology and Cell Science in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences CALS at the University of Florida. She received her Ph.D. in Cancer Biology at University of Wisconsin – Madison. She teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in human genomics. Her research explores factors that affect student pathways and outcomes in STEM with an emphasis on the role of online education in increasing access and diversity and meeting the needs of transfer and nontraditional undergraduate students. She is a PI of two federally funded STEM education grants and serves on the Assessment and Validation Committee for the Network for the Integration of Bioinformatics in Life Sciences Education.

Guideline Development Group
Shannon Dunn, Information Technology

Shannon Dunn, Information Technology

Intentional and sustained focus on fairness and equity in assessment in higher education is essential for many reasons: to provide extensive access to high-quality educational opportunities, to foster a growth mindset and passion for critical thinking and lifelong learning among students, to afford unbiased assessment of student learning outcomes, to express appreciation for human diversity in the learning process, and to begin identifying and combatting structural inequality.- Shannon Dunn

Shannon Dunn, PhD., is an Assistant Director with University of Florida Information Technology where she manages instructional design and educational technology services at the Center for Instructional Technology and Training. Shannon's background includes undergraduate and graduate instruction with an emphasis on experiential learning and authentic assessment. With over a decade of experience in delivery and support of instruction in higher education, she enjoys exploring the intersections of pedagogy with technology, learning spaces, and service delivery. Shannon leverages her experience and education across disciplines to model lifelong learning and to advocate for diversity, equity, and inclusion efforts across IT and higher education. Shannon holds a Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy in Anthropology along with a Certificate in University Teaching from Syracuse University, and a Bachelor of Arts from New College of Florida.

Model Development Group
Rosemarie Fernandez, College of Medicine

Rosemarie Fernandez, College of Medicine

Rigorous assessment is a critical component of education. Meaningful performance feedback informs the learner and the educator, identifying areas of strength and weakness. However, failure to support fairness and equity during assessment design can negatively impact learners at the individual level and can adversely affect our ability to grow and sustain a diverse academic community. I am excited about the opportunity to work with this committee, as I believe in building a safe, nurturing environment where students from all backgrounds can reach their full potential. - Rosemarie Fernandez

Rosemarie Fernandez is an Associate Professor in Emergency Medicine and the Research Director for the Center for Experiential Learning and Simulation at the University of Florida. Dr. Fernandez has expertise in both medical education research and healthcare team performance research.  Her work involves developing and implementing rigorous assessment platforms to measure individual and team performance.  Dr. Fernandez has been a Principal Investigator on multiple large medical education and simulation-based grants funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the Department of Defense, and the State of Washington. She is a decision editor for the journal Simulation in Healthcare and for the Journal of the American College of Emergency Physicians (JACEP) – Open.

 

Guideline Development Group
Steven Foti, College of Public Health and Health Professions & College of Medicine

Steven Foti, College of Public Health and Health Professions & College of Medicine

Assessment is such an integral piece of the teaching and learning process in higher education that it must be given the time and energy to be applied equitably and fairly across all examinees. Efforts placed into the alignment of assessments with their objectives and goals are wasted if the assessment experience differs based on the characteristics of the examinees. While fairness and equity in assessment are not trivial objectives, I believe that modern data collection and analysis tools afford us the opportunity to make significant progress toward them. -Steven Foti

Steven Foti is a Clinical Assistant Professor and Director of the Online MS Program in the Department of Biostatistics. He teaches graduate biostatistics courses to students in the Colleges of Public Health and Health Professions and Medicine with a wide range of academic backgrounds. With a PhD in Curriculum and Instruction and a background in statistics education, Dr. Foti has experience with the development of the Levels of Conceptual Understanding of Statistics (LOCUS) assessments and dedicates much of his time to improving the learning experiences for students in his courses.

Model Development Group
Rachel J. C. Fu, College of Heath and Human Performance

Rachel J. C. Fu, College of Heath and Human Performance

Vision is about who we want to become. Mission is about what we do to become who we want to be. Fair and equitable assessment plays an essential role to advocate whether the goals of education are being met.  Indeed, assessments inspire us to ask an authentic question: “Are we preparing our generations for now and years ahead?” I am excited to be part of our UF’s Task Force on Fairness and Equity in Assessment to work with entities collaboratively and collectively to prepare future leaders. - Rachel J.C. Fu

 

Rachel J. C. Fu is the Chair and Professor of the Department of Tourism, Hospitality, and Event Management (THEM) in the College of Health and Human Performance (HHP) at the University of Florida, where she is also the Director of the Eric Friedheim Tourism Institute (EFTI). In the past decade, through serving as guest editor, associate editor, editorial board member, and reviewer, Rachel has provided leadership in academic and professional organizations. Rachel has published more than 178 papers, including refereed journal articles (55), refereed conference papers (71), a magazine article (1), newsletters (10), technical reports (37), and book chapters (4). Rachel serves as HHP Dean’s I.D.E.A. Council Chair & Campus Diversity Liaison.

Model Development Group
Audrey Gainey, Human Resources

Audrey Gainey, Human Resources

Assessment is vital to determine strengths and opportunities in academic programs, ways to close gaps in student learning, and acquire important information in every discipline.   Being a part of the UF Task Force on Fairness and Equity in Assessment affords me the opportunity to make an impact in this area by use of  my knowledge and understanding of  inclusive measures that eliminate barriers, mitigate bias, and support the development and establishment of fair and equitable systems and practices.  I’m excited about the opportunity to learn and grow with this Task Force. - Audrey Gainey

Audrey Gainey, Senior Certified Professional – Society of Human Resources (SCP-SHRM) serves as Director of Talent Acquisition and Onboarding for University of Florida Human Resources.  She is  responsible for developing and accessing strategies in support of inclusive recruiting, selection and hiring for faculty and staff that emphasizes the candidate experience, strengthens the recruiting model and programs, and optimizes the UF employment brand.

Model Development Group
Victoria Grant, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Victoria Grant, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

The active pursuit of fairness and equity is greater than words. It requires strong action that challenges the validity of these statements and promises. The goal of an institution should be to promote every action that highlights equity and inclusivity as a foundation to achievement. As students, we are taught to value the assessment of our work as a symbol of merit and success. However, this definition of success limits the opportunities for individuals of various financial backgrounds, racial groups, and ability levels. There needs be a shift from disparity to collectivity. We need to provide resources that allow students to grow. We need to encourage academic assessments that empower students to learn and become leaders in their fields, not simply obtain a degree. We need to strive to aim for strategies and practices that determine the true nature and capability of a student. Discrimination in the face of assessment and distribution of prospects has a long history within institutions of education, from admissions, testing procedures and materials, score interpretations, and individual assessment. In an ever-diversifying society, we are presented with a unique opportunity to recognize and rectify systems of inequity and build a new foundation that emphasizes holistic achievement. - Victoria Grant

Victoria Grant is an undergraduate student at the University of Florida pursing her B.A. in Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience Psychology. With a research and clinical background in health psychology and counseling aide, Ms. Grant is interested in obtaining a PhD in Clinical Psychology where she hopes to inspire the focus of minority populations in research and representation in the overall field of science. Outside of her academic achievements, Ms. Grant is a devoted student leader through representation of the Hispanic/Latinx community at UF, social justice activism, community service, and administrative support. Interested in the advancement of Black and Brown communities and underreported identities, Victoria is excited to serve of the UF taskforce on fairness and equity of assessment, working to make the nature of our campus is worthy of its mission.  

 

Model Development Group
Barry Hartz, College of the Arts

Barry Hartz, College of the Arts

Assessments are used throughout higher education to determine who is admitted to an institution and who thrives within an educational community. This applies equally to faculty, staff, and students - the admittance and achievements of all community members are subject to assessment and the processes used to assess performance have historically contributed to inequities in opportunities for inclusion and advancement for many underrepresented groups of people. As both a public school music teacher and university faculty member, I have seen firsthand how assessments can be used both to exclude people from educational opportunities and to support people with diverse strengths and needs and am committed to examining every aspect of institutional assessments to assure that all prospective and current members of the UF community have the access and support they need to excel. - Barry Hartz

Barry Hartz is an Assistant Professor at the University of Florida whose research focuses on innovative means of developing music literacy and ensemble performance. Here at UF, Dr. Hartz teaches courses in Instrumental Music Methods, Technology, Literature and Arranging, and Curriculum Design, as well as supervising student teachers and collaborating with public school band directors throughout North Central Florida. Prior to coming to UF, Dr. Hartz had a 30-year career directing high school and middle school bands in Ohio and was named the Outstanding Music Educator for the state of Ohio in 2013. 

Guideline Development Group
JOanna Hernandez, College of Journalism and Communications

JOanna Hernandez, College of Journalism and Communications

We live in a diverse society. As educators, we want to ensure that we provide all our students with the tools they need to be successful. Assessment is our tool to ensure the educational process in which we maneuver is fair and equitable for all our students — who will work toward creating a better future that benefits all of society. - Joanna Hernandez

Joanna Hernandez is a lecturer at the College of Journalism and Communications’ Journalism Department. She is also CJC’s Director of Inclusion and Diversity and serves as co-chair of the Inclusion, Diversity and Equity Committee. Hernandez has a bachelor’s degree from New York University, where she studied journalism; and a Master of Public Administration from Baruch College, where she specialized in government and nonprofits. In addition, she has served as a council member of the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communication. She is also a college program evaluator for the ACEJMC, evaluating college journalism programs up for accreditation. She currently serves on the board of directors for The Independent Florida Alligator and was recently elected treasurer of Journalism and Women Symposium (JAWS). 

 

Model Development Group
Corinne Huggins-Manley, College of Education

Corinne Huggins-Manley, College of Education

As a scholar of measurement, I believe in the power of assessment for improving educational outcomes. But we cannot ignore that assessments are often advertently and inadvertently used to maintain systems of privilege and power in society. We must integrate and continuously evaluate fairness in assessment to ensure that we are improving educational outcomes for all students rather than providing undue advantages for some groups of students over others. - Corinne Huggins-Manley

Corinne Huggins-Manley is an Associate Professor in the Research and Evaluation Methodology program in the College of Education. Her research is focused on educational measurement, concerning issues of test fairness, validity, and statistical modeling. Dr. Huggins-Manley teaches multiple graduate level courses that include Theory of Measurement, Item Response Theory, and Rating Scale Design and Analysis. In addition, she provides methodological consultation on various research grants and projects.

Co-Chair
Madeline Joseph, College of Medicine

Madeline Joseph, College of Medicine

With the ever-changing landscape of education in the medical field and efforts needed to close the gaps in health disparities, I believe it is critical to consistently perform systematic assessment of the entire educational process. That includes assessment of the educational goals, learners’ competencies, and assessment of innovative pedagogical approaches to ensure maximal individual learning. Recently, I have been involved in the review of competencies in Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion across the continuum of medical education. I am thrilled to have the opportunity to collaborate with other faculty throughout UF to help shape the development and the implementation of fair and equitable assessment at UF. - Madeline Joseph

Madeline Joseph is a Professor of Emergency Medicine and Pediatrics in the College of Medicine, Jacksonville. She is the Associate Dean for Inclusion and Equity. She held the directorship of the Pediatric Emergency Medicine (PEM) Fellowship program from 1996 to 2006 and now is the Co-Chair of the PEM Clinical Competency Committee. Dr. Joseph is involved in numerous national and state leadership positions including serving on the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) Education Committee and Maintenance of Certification. Currently, Dr. Joseph is serving on the Board of Directors of the American Academy of Pediatrics. With her expertise in education, clinical and leadership her scholarly interest includes assessment of the impact of integrating diversity, equity, and inclusion in medical education to achieve health equity for all patients. 

Model Development Group
Brian Keith, Smathers Libraries

Brian Keith, Smathers Libraries

The UF Task Force on Fairness and Equity in Assessment represents an exciting opportunity.  At no point has higher education been a more essential contributor to the greater good or held more potential to benefit individuals by positioning them to live the fullest and most impactful lives. Our work is critical for our democracy, which faces profound challenges, and for realizing more just civic institutions. Advances in academic assessment are critical in delivering upon this promise.  Because of this importance and because of the implications of assessment results, this work must be performed ethically, with awareness and a commitment to fairness and equity. -Brian Keith

Brian W. Keith serves as the associate dean for administrative services and faculty affairs for the George A. Smathers Libraries.  As a senior administrator, he contributes to wide ranging and impactful decisions and to the determination of the strategic directions of the Libraries.  Brian’s work helps position the Libraries to meet challenges while fostering transparency, fairness and inclusion, workplace and workforce development, and collaboration and partnerships. His research emphasizes technological, social and cultural aspects for change management and transformational collaboration. Specific areas include, combating colonialism in information systems and collections, equity and inclusion in academic libraries, and opportunities for integrating libraries into graduate education.

Guideline Development Group
Patrick Klager, English Language Institute

Patrick Klager, English Language Institute

Assessment is one of the most critical components of learning, and as a result, it is crucial to design assessments that are fair and equitable for all.  Without equitable and fair assessment, students would have a difficult time understanding their individual progress or self-motivating, and teachers would not be able to properly measure the effectiveness of their instruction and adapt it to meet the needs of their individual students.  I am excited to be a member of this task force and to work towards improving the quality of assessing and learning at the University of Florida. - Patrick Klager       

Patrick Klager is an Instructor and the Grammar Skill Coordinator at the University of Florida’s English Language Institute.  As an instructor, he teaches academic and conversational English to international students and prepares them for successful study at the graduate or undergraduate level in the United States.  As a coordinator, he maintains and reviews the grammar curriculum and designs the departmental grammar assessments.  His pedagogical interests include TESOL education, teacher education, and narrative inquiry as professional development.  Patrick received his M.A. in Linguistics and SLAT Certificate from the University of Florida.

Model Development Group
Maria Leite, College of Education

Maria Leite, College of Education

I believe fairness and equity are essential elements of assessment. As a former special education teacher, I value assessment practices that take in consideration students’ individual characteristics (e.g., ability, social, cultural, and linguistic) to maximize the development of their strengths and promote opportunities to expand their knowledge. My interest in fair and equitable assessment practices in the context of higher education—more specifically, teacher education—is founded in how teachers have been prepared to implement assessment practices that ensure fairness and equity to all students. - Maria Leite

Maria Cristina Leite is the Coordinator of Assessment and Diversity Initiatives at the University of Florida College of Education. In this role, Maria is responsible for collecting students’ performance data for certification purposes, and managing the college assessment system platform. Maria provides support to instructors, students and administrators associated with UF’s educator preparation programs. She has performed at national and international conferences and currently serves on committees and teacher communities. Maria collaborates in collective efforts to implement initiatives to ensure success and advancement of BIPOC students and faculty within the College of Education. Her research interests include curriculum and assessment, social justice in education, the historical and social context of race relations, and community education. Maria is a member of the Campus Diversity Liaisons Network.

Guideline Development Group
Heather Maness, Center for Instructional Technology and Training

Heather Maness, Center for Instructional Technology and Training

As a higher education institution committed to facilitating the acquisition of knowledge and skills amongst a diverse community for a better society, we have an obligation to use valid and reliable student assessment methods. Evaluator bias (implicit and explicit) and poor alignment to student learning objectives can lead to issues with fairness and equity in assessment practices, and thus, validity of those results. Therefore, it is important to regularly analyze our assessments to continuously improve them in their use as both evaluation and learning tools, especially as it relates to our evolving awareness of bias against certain groups. - Heather Maness

Heather Maness is an Instructional Designer with the Center for Instructional Technology and Training in UF Information Technology. In this role she has helped subject matter experts develop award-winning courses, adopt the latest in educational technology, and implement evidence-based best practices in pedagogy. With a STEM background and passion for evaluation, she holds a M.S. in Veterinary Medical Sciences and a Ph.D. in Agricultural Education and Communication with a minor in Higher Education Administration. Her research focuses on stakeholder (students and employers) evaluation for continuous quality improvement of course design and curricula. She is also involved with several projects on improving learning analytics visualizations and data application.

Guideline Development Group
Lynne Meyer, College of Medicine

Lynne Meyer, College of Medicine

Equity is basically the quality of being impartial or fair.  Performing assessments in higher education without favoritism, discrimination or bias is crucial. Seminal concepts in regards to fairness and equity in educational evaluation and assessment are described in publications by the Joint Committee on Standards for Educational Evaluation (JCSEE).  Application of JCSEE standards such as human rights and respect, clarity and fairness, transparency and disclosure, justified conclusions and decisions, explicit evaluation reasoning, explicit criteria and functional reporting amongst many other standards not only are germane and necessary for assessment to be fair, moral and just, but also may be used as a rubric during planning.  Without implementation of standards such as these, the consequences of unfair evaluation practices can be devastating to individuals, institutions and society in various ways including but not limited to esteem, reputation and finances.  Programs and learners in higher education deserve fair and impartial assessment of educational strategies and evaluation of learner performance. - Lynne Meyer

Lynne Meyer is the Medical Educator at the University of Florida’s College of Medicine’s Graduate Medical Education office where she focuses on program accreditation, program evaluation, faculty development, patient safety and quality improvement.  Her prior work experience included serving as an Executive Director for the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and as an Assistant Dean for Medical Education and Evaluation for the University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria.  She has worked in the fields of undergraduate and graduate medical education for over 30 years.  She has earned master’s degrees in both Education and Public Health in addition to a doctoral degree in Education and Organizational Leadership.  Dr. Meyer’s original career was as a dental hygienist. 

Guideline Development Group
David Miller, College of Education

David Miller, College of Education

The Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing (2014) establish three foundational elements for testing: validity, reliability and fairness. In fairness, we are addressing the fundamental concern that we are protecting all test takers and test users in all aspects testing regardless of race, gender, or any other characteristic (e.g., first generation, disabilities).  The intent of UF’s Task Force on Fairness and Equity is to provide guidelines for fair and equitable testing throughout all stages of test development, use and interpretation.  Combined with validity and reliability, these are the most important considerations is assessment and accountability.- David Miller

M. David Miller is a Professor of Research and Evaluation Methods in the College of Education and the Director of the School of Human Development and Organizational Studies in Education.  His research interests are in assessment and evaluation focusing on issues of validity, reliability and fairness.  At UF, he has served as the Director of the UF Quality Enhancement Plan, a member of the Academic Assessment Committee, a member of the Quest Task Force, and currently chairs the General Education Assessment Subcommittee.   He has published broadly on applied and theoretical issues in assessment and psychometrics, and authored two books on assessment.  He is the Director of the Collaborative Assessment and Program Evaluation Services where he has been active in grants (PI, co-PI or Evaluator) through NSF, NIH, IES and other federal agencies and private foundations.    

Co-chair
Teresa Mutahi, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Teresa Mutahi, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

As a higher education institution comprised of a diverse group of students, faculty and staff; it is critical to insure that our systems, methods, environments, technological tools and pedagogical strategies all contribute towards fair and equitable assessment outcomes. The UF Task Force on Fairness and Equity will explore where we are and identify possible recommendations and guidelines towards achieving fairness and equity in our assessments at the University of Florida. - Teresa Mutahi

Teresa Mutahi is a senior lecturer, an undergraduate coordinator and the associate director for the cross college biology major offered by the college of liberal arts and sciences (CLAS) and the college of agricultural life sciences (CALS). With an expertise in biology, science and mathematics education, Dr. Mutahi is interested in research and initiatives geared towards biology/STEM curriculum development, active learning strategies and assessment. Another area of interest is enhancing success of underrepresented groups in STEM programs. It is exciting to serve on the UF taskforce on fairness and equity in assessment to contribute towards the mission of the University of Florida by advancing assessment excellence in higher education.

Co-chair
Nawari Nawari, College of Design, Construction, and Planning

Nawari Nawari, College of Design, Construction, and Planning

Fairness and Equity in academic assessment are essential parts of effective teaching. Using a fair and equitable assessment system to measure students learning outcomes offer every individual an opportunity to achieve their full potentials and goals. Such an approach will also minimize implicit bias, enhance diversity, and foster a healthy academic environment at UF. - Nawari Nawari

 Nawari Nawari is an associate professor in the College of Design, Construction, and Planning (DCP), School of Architecture. He serves as the Diversity officer for the college. Dr. Nawari has written and co-authored 6 books and over 150 publications and advised more than 80 Master and Ph.D. Students. Dr. Nawari research focuses on BIM standardization, automating building code conformance checking, and Blockchain Technologies. He is a member of the BIM committee of the Structural Engineering Institute (SEI) and co-chaired the subcommittee on BIM in education. For over 20 years, Dr. Nawari is a board-certified professional engineer in Florida and Ohio. Notably, Dr. Nawari was inducted as a fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) in 2016 for sustaining records of contributions to the field.

Model Development Group
Donna Parker, Pediatrics, UF Health

Donna Parker, Pediatrics, UF Health

Graduation from institutions of higher education leads to increased opportunity for employment in a field which an individual enjoys, thus promoting personal satisfaction.  Meaningful employment provides financial stability, allowing a graduate to change the trajectory of the entire family, often the community in addition to that of the graduate.  I consider higher education to be the greatest equalizer to improve financial assets and standard of living, resulting in better health outcomes, increased quality of housing and access to quality schools, amongst other gains. Access to higher education is often limited, with those from traditionally underrepresented minority racial/ethnic groups having less opportunities to matriculate. Upon matriculation, it is important that the institution is prepared and willing to afford equitable access to a full and rich educational experience, providing resources based on the student’s needs. These needs may be physical, psychological (eg. sense of belonging), differences in the level of preparedness based on the high school attended, language or effects of bias based on race, ethnicity, nationality, sexual orientation, religion, age, gender, geography or other differences. In addition to equitable resources, the institution must assure that the assessment of students is fair and without bias, to ensure that students achieve their full educational potential in order to benefit from the fruits of higher education. - Donna Parker

Donna M. Parker currently serves as the Associate Dean for Diversity and Health Equity, and Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Florida Health, in Gainesville, Florida. Dr. Parker graduated from Florida International University in Miami, Florida with the Bachelor of Arts degree in Chemistry in 1986, and from the University of Florida, College of Medicine in 1990 with the Doctor of Medicine degree. She completed her pediatric residency training at UF Shands Hospital in 1993, and was employed at the Alachua County Health Department as a staff pediatrician. In 1998, she became a member of the University of Florida, department of Pediatrics faculty and was also appointed as Assistant Dean for Minority Affairs; later promoted to Associate Dean for the Office for Diversity and Health Equity.

Model Development Group
Rose Pringle, College of Education

Rose Pringle, College of Education

In higher education, a fair and equitable assessment system aligned with teaching and learning goals, provides continuous evidence of all students’ learning. For effectiveness, instructors then  incorporate this information into their instructional decisions as they seek to meet the learning needs of their diverse learners.Rose M. Pringle

Rose M. Pringle is an associate professor in science education in the School of Teaching and Learning.  Her research agenda includes interrelated themes within the continuum of science teacher education, including teacher learning, science curriculum and science-specific pedagogical practices, and  promoting teachers’ cultural competence. Dr. Pringle investigates pedagogical content knowledge as a framework for shifting practices to heighten teachers’ stance toward issues of social justice and their roles in positioning learners who traditionally, are underrepresented in science – specifically, girls of African descent. She therefore operates at the nexus between what knowledge teachers need and how it becomes translated into equitable and culturally sustaining science teaching practices. Her work with teachers challenges assumptions and the status quo toward broadening participation in science and science related-careers.

Model Development Group
Jennifer Ramos, English Language Institute

Jennifer Ramos, English Language Institute

The main goal of assessment is to measure what students have learned to do, apply, or comprehend through instruction. Good assessment gives us a good representation of students’ knowledge and abilities. When we create our assessment with the principles of fairness and equity in mind, we are helping to ‘bias for best’; in other words, we are working to set up the conditions needed to produce the best representation of what students can do with the knowledge and experience they have gained through instruction. - Jennifer Ramos

Jen Ramos is a senior lecturer with the English Language Institute, an intensive six-level language program where students gain the language proficiency to begin study in the U.S. Jen has worked and taught in several countries, including Spain, Venezuela, and Dominican Republic. In 2015 she worked with the Ministry of Education in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic to formalize the English language curriculum for their publicly-founded, nation-wide English language program. Jen has been teaching faculty at UF since 2005.

Guideline Development Group
Raúl Sánchez, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Raúl Sánchez, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Raúl Sánchez is Associate Professor in the Department of English and Affiliate Faculty in the Center for Latin American Studies. He is the author of two books: The Function of Theory in Composition Studies (SUNY, 2005) and Inside the Subject: A Theory of Identity for the Study of Writing (NCTE, 2017). He is the co-editor, with Iris D. Ruiz, of Decolonizing Rhetoric and Composition Studies: New Latinx Keywords for Theory and Pedagogy (Palgrave, 2016). He teaches courses in advanced composition, rhetorical theory, and cultural studies. He is the former co-president of the Latinx Caucus of the Conference on College Composition and Communication. He is the former president of the UF chapter of the United Faculty of Florida.

Model Development Group
Richard Segal; College of Pharmacy

Richard Segal; College of Pharmacy

Attention to fairness and equity in assessment needs to be at the top of the agenda in higher education, as illustrated by recently raised questions such as whether the GRE produces scores that are biased in favor of or against student groupings that share traits such as gender, race and ethnicity.  The UF Task Force on Fairness and Equity in Assessment is a significant forward step in the University’s progress to address inequality and bias on campus. - Richard Segal

Rich Segal is a Professor at the Department of Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy.  He specializes in designing new systems for improving the safety of medications.  Dr. Segal’s current research is funded by the Florida Department of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) where he focuses on creating culturally intelligent interventions to improve medication taking practices of people from diverse backgrounds.  He has also been active in adresssing diversity and inclusion at the College and University levels.  Rich earned a Ph.D. in the field of medication safety and pharmacy at Virginia Commonwealth University’s Medical College of Virginia campus.

Model Development Group
Candice Stefanou, College of Agricultural and Life Sciences

Candice Stefanou, College of Agricultural and Life Sciences

One hallmark of attaining an advanced degree is that completion opens doors that might otherwise remain closed. The benefits of earning a college degree should not be ignored. From increased lifetime earning potential to the professional networks that are available, college graduates are likely to see advantages those without a degree may never experience.  Fairness and equity in assessment in higher education is essential at every step along the way, from admissions decisions to evaluations of readiness for further study.  Without fair, equitable, and culture-fair assessment, the promises of the opportunities an advanced degree can provide are unlikely to be realized. As we engage in our own examination of our predilections and assumptions, we work toward creating processes and procedures that do not disadvantage any group. As an educational psychologist with a specialization in applied measurement and a school psychologist applying assessment methods to assist struggling children, I’ve always believed that assessment and the conclusions we draw from those assessments must be created, conducted, and interpreted with the lens that keep fairness and equity in sharp focus. - Candice Stefanou

Candice Stefanou is an Adjunct Professor of Family, Youth and Community Sciences at the University of Florida College of Agricultural and Life Sciences.  She teaches courses in social science research in the undergraduate program; serves as the Undergraduate Coordinator for the Family, Youth and Community Sciences department; and works with faculty in the College of Veterinary Medicine on research related to teaching and learning in the professions and outcomes assessment.  Prior to her appointment at the University of Florida, Dr. Stefanou was Professor of Education at Bucknell University, Lewisburg, Pa. Dr. Stefanou conducts research in college student learning, particularly around issues of how learning environments impact student motivation and self-regulated learning.

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Robert Thomas, Warrington College of Business

Robert Thomas, Warrington College of Business

As the events of 2020 illustrate, the lack of equity, inclusion, and access are pervasive in U.S. society. The multitude of videos illustrating the brutality of police against black and brown people makes it impossible to ignore the inequality of physical interactions with authority figures.  Yet, less visible and, often, less intentional practices obstruct marginalized communities from obtaining access to opportunities that lead to equitable and inclusive treatment.  Assessment is a practice that has often served as an obstructive force against universal access and opportunity in our society. Higher education has long served as a gateway to upward mobility as well as access and opportunity.  If serving all the peoples of Florida is foundational in the University of Florida mission, then it is essential that the assessments it employs meet the standards of equity and inclusion. - Robert Thomas

Robert E. Thomas is Darden Restaurants Professor of Diversity Management and Assistant Dean for Inclusion, Diversity, Equity, and Access in the Warrington College of Business. He has also served as Chair of the Management Department in the Warrington College, and President of the Academy of Legal Studies in Business. His research is in the areas of intellectual property, negotiation, and conflict management. Previous appointments include the University of Michigan Business School and the Institut D’Administration Des Entreprises in Aix-en-Provence, France, and visiting positions at the Wharton School of Business, University of Pennsylvania, and Stanford Business School. Professor Thomas is a Princeton University graduate and received his J.D. and Ph.D. from Stanford Law School and Stanford Business School, respectively.  

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Anna M. Thrombley, Information Technology

Anna M. Thrombley, Information Technology

A fair and equitable assessment is essential for the University, as we focus on how to improve the student learning experience, continue to innovate how we teach, this is an opportunity to create the best possible learning outcomes to ensure student success. - Anna M. Thrombley

Anna M. Thrombley serves as the Assistant Director, Human Resources at University of Florida Information Technology.  Her job responsibilities include oversight and development of talent management initiatives, including recruitment, retention, performance management, employee relations, diversity, equity and inclusion, and staff development for over 600 employees. She also serves on the Campus Diversity Liaisons and on the HR Liaisons for the University of Florida. Prior to joining UF, she held the position of HR executive in the financial services industry.  She directed and managed the administration of employee surveys,  including the development of action plans.  Anna earned her BA degree in Finance at the University of South Florida.

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Judy Traveis, Graduate School

Judy Traveis, Graduate School

Higher education has a rich history with the various types of assessment that are conducted in the academy. Not only does higher education need assessments to be valid and reliable, they must be fair and equitable. It is critical that fairness and equity in assessment prevail, to ensure that each person, program etc. has the same opportunities, that is neither individuals nor groups are place in a position of unfair advantage or disadvantage. - Judy Traveis

 

Judy Traveis is a University of Florida alumna and has been a UF employee for more than 20+ years. Her UF career in academic advising began in the College of Health and Human Performance. From 2006 through 2015 she served as Coordinator, and then Senior Coordinator, in the UF Athletic Association. After completing her doctoral studies, she worked as an Academic Program Specialist in the College of Education, and since 2017 as Assistant Dean for Administration within the Graduate School. Her experience includes student advisement tailored to individual needs and broader focus on organization and policy that foster academic success.

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Lenny Ureña Valerio, Center for Latin American Studies

Lenny Ureña Valerio, Center for Latin American Studies

My interest in assessment stems from my passion for working with students, advancing the goals of international programs and area-studies centers. Having clear student-learning outcomes based on fairness and equity values should be at the core of any institution. Assessment tools allow us to obtain critical data we need to serve better our students and enrich their educational experience. To do this effectively, we should consider students’ diverse learning experiences, affording them equitable opportunities to demonstrate their knowledge and providing them with equally important resources to help them achieve their full potential. - Lenny Ureña Valerio

Lenny A. Ureña Valerio is the Associate Director of Administrative Services in the Center for Latin American Studies at the University of Florida. She received her BA in history from the University of Puerto Rico and her Ph.D. in Central/East European history from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Her primary research and teaching interests include imperial/colonial studies, European migration to Latin America, Polish diaspora in Brazil, history of medicine and public health, and historical methods and theories. She is the author of Colonial Fantasies, Imperial Realities: Race Science and the Making of Polishness on the Fringes of the German Empire, 1840-1920 (Ohio University Press, 2019), winner of the 2020 Kulczycki Book Prize in Polish Studies awarded by the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies. The book also received honorable mention for the 2020 Heldt Prize Prize awarded by the Association for Women in Slavic Studies. She is currently the President of the Consortium for Latin American Programs (CLASP). 

Guideline Development Group
Ryan Vasquez, College of Journalism and Communications

Ryan Vasquez, College of Journalism and Communications

In our pursuit to provide students with a general education we often overlook the diversity in approaches needed to help each student obtain that goal. A greater focus on fairness and equity will make sure we don't cut off certain parts of our student population to the opportunities all students who attend this university deserve to have. - Ryan Vasquez

Ryan Vasquez is a Multimedia News Manager for Audio in the Innovation News Center and adjunct instructor in the College of Journalism and Communications.  He is an award-winning journalist with his work being recognized by the Society of Professional Journalists, Radio Television Digital News Association, and the Associated Press in Alabama and Florida. His work with students embraces the teaching hospital style of education where students get to learn alongside professionals in a real-world work environment. His area of expertise is long-form journalism including radio documentaries and podcasting. Ryan earned his BS in Telecommunication News from the University of Florida and MS in Interactive Technology from the University of Alabama. 

Guideline Development Group
Mary Watt, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Mary Watt, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Fairness and equity are essential to realizing the aspirations of higher education.  The creation and dissemination of new knowledge is best achieved when all participants have equal access to that knowledge.  External impediments to such access should be examined and, where possible, removed.  Knowledge is precious, certainly, but its value is diminished when it is only available to the few rather than to the many. - Mary Watt

Mary Watt is a Professor of Italian and Associate Dean of the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences (CLAS).  She received her Ph.D. in Italian Studies in 1998 from the University of Toronto.  She received a J.D. from the same university in 1987.  Dr. Watt serves as college liaison for more than fifteen interdisciplinary research centers and programs, and oversees international issues (study exchanges, cooperative research agreements, immigration policy.)  Dr. Watt is also responsible for Faculty Affairs in CLAS (includes collective bargaining negotiations, grievances and discipline,) Title IX complaints and Market Equity requests, and for reviewing and approving department bylaws.  She coordinates the CLAS Diversity and Inclusion Steering Committee and associated Liaison Program, and also serves as CLAS liaison to the UF Chief Diversity Officer. 

Guideline Development Group
Ryan Yang, Information Technology

Ryan Yang, Information Technology

As an education technologist, I am interested in the use of technology to help create an equitable and inclusive learning experience for all students. Ensuring our selection and deployment of assessment technologies for the campus take into consideration of access, equity, privacy, and security of the students. Technology can also help instructors implement innovative, engaging and effective assessment strategies that are authentic and meets the learning objectives of the courses. - Ryan Yang

Ryan Yang is the Associate Director of Teaching and Learning Technology at the University of Florida Information Technology. Ryan is responsible for the strategic direction of the Center for Instructional Technology and Training (CITT), which includes instructional design, media production, Learning Analytics, Assessment Technology Services, and Learning Space & A/V Design services. With two decades of experience supporting faculty in applying emerging educational technologies, Ryan is passionate about creating learning experiences that are effective and engaging for the learners. Before joining the University of Florida, Ryan was Associate Director of Academic Information Technology at Michigan State University where he led efforts ranging from digital accessibility, instructional design, education technology systems, and serve on the leadership team at MSU’s Hub for Innovation in Learning and Technology.

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